Ayurveda UG Textbook Says, Grind Urad Dal and Mustard Seeds With Curd To Conceive A Baby Boy!

The Ayurveda is the ancient Indian system of natural and holistic medicine. While allopathic medicine tends to focus on the management of disease, Ayurveda provides us with the knowledge of how to prevent disease and how to eliminate its root cause if it does occur and having some magic trick treatments,

According to Ayurveda if you want a baby boy, collect two north facing branches of banyan tree(east facing will iso suffice)that has grown in a stable, take precisely two grains of urad dal and mustard seeds, grind all the ingredients with curd, and consume the mixture.

This recipe is not some self-styled godman’s prescription to fool gullible couples. It’s part of the third-year Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine, and Surgery (BAMS) textbook that informs students on techniques to conceive a boy. The text has been copied from Charaka Samhita, the pre-2nd Century CE compilation on Ayurveda, which is included in the current BAMS syllabus.

According to the textbook, the process of creating a male fetus is called `pusanvan’, and any woman who desires a boy should be “blessed with the pusanvan ritual” as soon as she gets pregnant.

The textbook lists various techniques to ensure the birth of a boy.

One such technique is rather expensive. It says: “Create two miniature statues of a man out of gold, silver, or iron and throw the statues in a furnace. Pour that molten element in milk, curd or water, and on an auspicious hour of Pushp Nakshatra, consume it.”
The BAMS syllabus in the state is supervised by the Maharashtra University of Health Sciences (MUHS) in Nashik, and Dr Dilip Mhaisekar, the former dean of the Dr Shankarrao Chavan Government Medical College in Nanded, is the vice-chancellor.

Objection to the textbook’s contents was recently raised by Ganesh Borhade, a member of the district supervisory board of the Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (PCPNDT) Act, who is also associated with the Lek Ladki Abhiyan supervised by advocate Varsha Deshpande.

Doctors with BAMS degrees have a thriving practice not just in rural areas, but also in cities such as Mumbai, Pune, and Nashik. Many people shun allopathy in favour of Ayurveda, and if this is what medical students are being taught, God helps this society,” Borhade said.

He brought the textbook content to the notice of the PCPNDT Act authorities in the state, but it is unlikely that such content will be removed from the textbooks in the coming academic year.

Dr Asaram Khade, the Maharashtra PCPNDT Act consultant, told news agency that a letter has already been issued to the joint secretary, public health, Government of India regarding the syllabus in violation of the PCPNDT Act, even as Borhade warned that the Centre had less than a month to act. “The academic year starts in July, and such content supports female foeticide,” he said.

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