How to walk out of your job gracefully

Planning to quit your job? Here we will give you some decent ways to walk out of it. When you’re stuck in a bad job, fantasizing about dramatically quitting can get your through a bad day. You’ve decided to leave your job and hang your own shingle. But first, there’s much to consider. You’d probably like to stay on good terms with your former employer. You may have signed a non compete agreement. And it wouldn’t hurt to take some customers with you. Here’s what you need to know to navigate the transition from working for someone else to being your own boss.

Before you quit:

1. GET YOUR CONTACTS UP TO DATE.
It’s a good idea to keep your contact list up-to-date on regular basis, but if you haven’t done so, start working on it while you’re job-hunting, says Tom Gimbel, president and CEO of LaSalle Network, a Chicago-based staffing and recruiting firm. Connect on LinkedIn and keep a list of telephone numbers, email addresses and other contact information. Just don’t do it all at once after you know you’re leaving, or it will be obvious that something’s up.

2. QUIETLY REMOVE SOME OF YOUR PERSONAL BELONGINGS.
While some companies expect you to stay on for two or more weeks, other companies ask that you leave immediately for security purposes. “You don’t want to be that person with 16 boxes, creating a spectacle,” Rosen says.

3. STAY CALM.
You don’t know how people are going to feel once you leave. Some may be angry. Others may be jealous. Don’t take comments or attitudes seriously and have a plan for remaining calm if someone gets under your skin, Rosen advises. This may be a big change for some of your colleagues and that can be stressful.

After your resignation:

4. MAKE THE TRANSITION SMOOTH.
Wrap up as many projects as you can and leave instructions for your successor. Be forward-thinking and involve the team members who will be covering for you in any decisions you make that will affect them, such as starting a new project or making changes to an existing one.
“It’s also not unheard of to allow them to reach out to you with questions or even work with them for a short time after-hours on a consulting basis as long as that doesn’t violate any of the agreements with your new employer or create a conflict of interest,” Gimbel says.

5. FOLLOW UP WITH COLLEAGUES.
Gimbel suggests staying in touch with former colleagues who are open to it. You might write notes or email messages to former coworkers to say that you enjoyed working with them. Forward along articles or information that they may find of interest. These people are part of your network.
“It’s a small, small world,” Rosen adds. “After your first few jobs, you’re going to run into the same people over and over and over. It’s a lesson many young people learn the hard way.”

6. Embrace transparency
When it comes to leaving a company that will soon be a competitor, a little honesty goes a long way. “There’s a mistaken feeling that somehow this needs to be done covertly”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *