While India stresses on deportation, Bangladesh to build 14,000 shelters for Rohingyas

According to the Bangladesh authority, the country would be building a massive camp on a 2,000 acre land in Kutupalong of Cox’s Bazar district.
Following the exodus of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar as at least 4,00,000 refugees arrived in Bangladesh since August 25, Bangladesh will be building 14,000 new shelters to accommodate the hundreds of thousands of immigrants camping on roadside, in fields and on hills. According to the Bangladesh authority, the country would be building a massive camp on a 2,000 acre land in Kutupalong of Cox’s Bazar district. Moreover the Bangladesh government’s social welfare agency assured taking care of the children who lost their parents in the ongoing violence in Myanmar.


As reported by AFP, Bangladesh`s disaster management secretary Shah Kamal said, “We have been told to build the shelters in 10 days. Each shelter will house six refugee families.”
However, even as Bangladesh plans to shelter the most number of Rohingya Muslims, a local rights expert named Nur Khan Liton hit out at the country’s government over the chaotic relief management.
“Refugees are still pouring in. But there is no attempt to bring discipline and order in the aid management. There is a serious lack of coordination among the government and the agencies. Still a lot of people are staying on the roadsides and in open space. Some have managed to erect a tent, others just sleeping under the open sky,” said Liton.
Bangladesh’s helping hand towards the Rohingya refugees come amid Indian politicos stressing on the deportation of the migrants from Myanmar. Earlier, a day after Zeid Ra’ad al Hussein, the top United Nations human rights official, condemned Myanmar’s “brutal security operation” in Rakhine state, Syed Akbaruddin, India’s Permanent Representative to the UN said “enforcing laws should not be mistaken for lack of compassion” and also regretted the UN body’s overlook on the “central role of terrorism”. Further insisting that the country must be concerned about illegal migrants with possible security threats to the country, Akbaruddin was quoted by ANI, saying, “Assessments of human rights should not be a matter of political convenience. We believe achieving human rights goals calls for objective consideration, balanced judgments, and verification of facts.”
Myanmar has been facing soaring pressure from the international body with harsh global condemnation as several thousand of Rohingya Muslims have fled Rakhina state to escape ethnic unrest in the area. Recently, US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson termed the violence ‘unacceptable’ and rights group Amnesty claimed to have evidence of the military’s systematic torching of villages.

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